Sexting porn

Added: Darcel Steelman - Date: 24.09.2021 12:49 - Views: 16353 - Clicks: 8126

Under the Australian law it is illegal to use your phone or internet to take, keep, look at, send, or ask someone to send sexual images or videos of anyone who is under 18 years of age or anyone who looks under the age of This law applies even if the photo or video is of yourself or if the person in the photo or video said it was OK. When sexting involves someone under 18 it can be considered child pornography.

Sexting is also a crime when it involves harassing people of any age. New intimate image laws have been put in place in Western Australia, which make it against the law for intimate images or videos to be shared of anyone under the age of 16 or without the consent of the person in it. An intimate image or video can be someone naked, in their underwear or a person doing anything private like using the toilet or showering.

Sexting can also impact you emotionally. Once an image is taken, it is easy to lose control over who sees it, especially if shared online. It can be embarrassing and hurtful, and can affect a person for many years. Be aware that even images sent using technology like Snapchat can be screenshotted and shared with other people without you knowing. If you send a sexual image or video and then regret it, talk to the person you sent it to as soon as possible and ask them to delete it.

If a sexual image or video of you has been shared online you can ask the person who shared it to remove it. If shared on social media un-tag yourself from the image or video and report the image so that it can be taken down. For more information on how to do this visit the eSafety website external site.

If they continue to send you unwanted sexts you can block them on social media or from text messages and calls on your phone. It is a good idea to ask a trusted adult for help and support. If you want to talk to someone over the phone anonymously or confidentially, you can call:. Youth Law Australia external site. Youth Law Australia provides free, confidential legal information and help for young people under Explains the laws in each state and includes information on: sexting, photos and videos on your phone, getting into trouble on social media, sexual harassment, sex and online privacy.

Bullying No Way aims to create learning environments where every student and school community member is safe, supported, respected, valued, and free from bullying, violence, harassment and discrimination. What are the laws? Emotional consequences Sexting can also impact you emotionally. If you think a crime has been committed, you can also contact the police. Where to go to for help It is a good idea to ask a trusted adult for help and support. If you want to talk to someone over the phone anonymously or confidentially, you can call: Sexual Health Helpline on 08 metro or country Kids Helpline on 55 Beyondblue on 22 Lifeline on 13 11 14 If you think a crime has been committed, you can also contact the police.

More information For more information on sexting and staying safe online, visit these websites: eSafety external site eSafety provides information and support for people who have experienced imaged-based abuse, their family and friends, and bystanders. Youth Law Australia external site Youth Law Australia provides free, confidential legal information and help for young people under Bullying No Way external site.

Ask a Question! Ask an anonymous question to a qualified Health Professional. .

Sexting porn

email: [email protected] - phone:(159) 808-8607 x 9331

for : sexting